All he needs is a white cockadeGo on! Click the Highlander

Midi file sequenced by Barry Taylor.

Another Version of Johnnie Cope 

Performed by: Laverock. Recorded by: pansbands.co.uk

Johnnie Cope   

 

                     Cope sent a letter frae Dunbar -

                    Charlie, meet me an' ye daur,

                    And I'll learn you the art o' war,

                    If you'll meet me in the morning.

 

                    Chorus;

                    Hey Johnnie Cope are ye waukin' yet?

                    Or are your drums a-beating yet?

                    If ye were waukin' I wad wait

                    To gang to the coals i' the morning.

 

                    When Charlie look'd the letter upon'

                    He drew his sword the scabbard from;

                    Come follow me, my merry merry men,

                   And we'll meet Johnnie Cope in the  morning.

        

                    When Johnnie Cope he heard o' this,

                    He thought it wadna be amiss,

                    To hae a horse in readiness

                    To flee awa' in the morning.

 

                    Fy now, Johnnie get up and rin,

                    The Highland bagpipes mak' a din;

                    It is best to sleep in a hale skin

                    For 'twill be a bluidy morning.

 

                    When Johnnie Cope to Dunbar came,

                    They speir'd at him, Where's a' your men?

                    The deil confound me gin I ken,

                     For I left them a' i' the morning.

 

                    Now, Johnnie troth ye are na blate,

                    To come wi, news o' your ain defeat,

                    And leave your men in sic a strait

                    Sae early in the morning.

 

                    Oh! faith quo' Johnnie, I got sic flegs,

                    Wi' their claymores and philabegs;

                    If I face them again, deil brak my legs -

                    So I wish you a gude morning.

 

 

Prince Charles' Highland army routed the Hanoverian army led by Sir John Cope at Prestonpans on 21st September 1745. The tune is an old Scottish Air. These words were written in 1745 by Adam Skirving (1719-1803), a tenant farmer in East Lothian. Robert Burns also wrote a set of lyrics to the tune.

Meaning of unusual words:
wauking=waking
speired=asked
blate=shy
sic=such
flegs=frights
philabegs=kilts

Click this Wee Laddie too!

Midi file sequenced by Barry Taylor.

 

My Bonnie Moorhen

My bonnie moorhen, my bonnie moorhen,
Up in the grey hills, and doon in the glen,
It's when ye gang butt the hoose, when ye gang ben
I'll drink a health tae my bonnie moorhen.

My bonnie moorhen's gane o'er the faim,
And it will be summer e'er she comes again,
But when she comes back again some folk will ken,
And drink a toast tae my bonnie moorhen.

My bonnie moorhen has feathers anew,
And she's a' fine colours, but nane o' them blue,
She's red an' she's white, an' she's green an' she's grey
My bonnie moorhen come hither away.

Come up by Glen Duich, and doon by Glen Shee
An' roun' by Kinclaven and hither tae me,
For Ranald and Donald are oot on the fen,
Tae brak the wing o' my bonnie moorhen.

 This song is one of many of the period with double meanings and disguise. The The Prince is the moorhen and Ranald and Donald are redcoat soldiers. The colours referred to are those of the old Stuart tartan. 

 

 

      


Sing along if you want to!Loch Lomond

Midi file sequenced By Barry Taylor

  It's an on-going click the Highlander  situation.

Ye Jacobites by Name

 (Words by Robert Burns c.1791)

Courtesy Schiltrum Music

One interpretations of this song is that two of Bonnie Prince Charlie's men were captured and left behind in Carlisle after the  rising of 1745. One soldier was to be executed, the other released. The Spirit of the dead soldier traveling by the 'low road' would reach Scotland before his comrade, who would be struggling along the actual road over high, rugged country  

 

Unlike many Jacobite songs this one does not entirely support Jacobite aspirations. There is an earlier version of the lyrics but whether it is suitable for this website I am not sure!!

Stop Press!!

New version of Ye Jacobites by Schiltrum Music who have kindly given permission for us to use this version. Hope you like it

 

 

By yon bonnie banks
And by yon bonnie braes,
Where the sun shines bright
On Loch Lomond
Oh we twa ha'e pass'd
sae mony blithesome days,
On the bonnie, bonnie banks
O' Loch Lomond.

Oh ye'll tak' the high road
and I'll tak' the low road,
An' I'll be in Scotland before ye',
But wae is my heart until we meet again
On the Bonnie, bonnie banks
O' Loch Lomond.

I mind where we parted
In yon shady glen
On the steep, steep side
O' Ben Lomon'
Where in purple hue
The highland hills we view
And the morn shines out
Frae the gloamin'

Oh ye'll tak' the high road
and I'll tak' the low road,
An' I'll be in gloaming before ye',
But wae is my heart until we meet again
On the Bonnie, bonnie banks
O' Loch Lomond.

The wee bird may sing
An' the wild flowers spring;
An' in sunshine the waters are sleepin'
But the broken heart
It sees nae second spring,
And the world does na ken
How we're greetin'

Oh ye'll tak' the high road
and I'll tak' the low road,
An' I'll be in greeting before ye',
But wae is my heart until we meet again
On the Bonnie, bonnie banks
O' Loch Lomond.

 

Ye Jacobites by name, lend an ear, give an ear!
Ye Jacobites by name, lend an ear,
Ye Jacobites by name,
Your faults I will proclaim,
Your doctrines I maun blame - you shall hear!

2. What is Right, and what is wrang, by the law, by the law?
What is Right, and what is Wrang, by the law?
What is Right, and what is Wrang?
A short sword and a lang,
A weak arm and a strang, for to draw!

3. What makes heroic strife, famed afar, famed afar?
What makes heroic strife famed afar?
What makes heroic strife ?
To whet th' assassin's knife,
Or hunt a Parent's life, wi bluidy war!

4. Then let your schemes alone, in the State, in the State!
Then let your schemes alone, in the State!
Then let your schemes alone,
Adore the rising sun,
And leave a man undone, to his fate!


Listen to the song  wild-mountain-thyme.mp3

 

 

Culloden Day 

John Roy Stewart 1700-1752

Latha Chul-Lodair 

Iain Ruadh Stiùbhart 1700-1752

 

Woe is me! The white bodies
That lie out on the hillsides,
Uncoffined, unshrouded,
Not even buried in holes;
Those who survived the disaster
Are carried to exile overseas by the winds,
The Whigs have got their will of us,
And ’rebels’ the name that we’re given.

We are under the heel of strangers,
Great the shame and disgrace that we feel,
Our country and homes have been plundered
No welcome awaits us there now;
Castle Downie is in fire-blackened ruins,
Unhonoured its bare, silent walls;
It is bitter indeed fortune’s changing
We have lost every comfort we had...

Inverness Gathering ( I believe this tune to be inspired by "Culloden Day". Let me know if I am wrong) Click the Highlander

Courtesy Canadian Bagpipes

Mo chreach mhòr! na cuirp ghleé-gheal
Tha ’nan laigh’ air na sléibhtean ud thall,
Gun chiste, gun léintean,
Gun adhlacadh fheéin anns na tuill;
Chuid tha beò dhiubh an déidh sgaoilidh
’S iad ’gan fògair le gaothan thar tuinn,
Fhuair na Chuigs an toil féin dinn,
’S cha chan iad ach ’reubaltaich’ ruinn.

Fhuair na Goill sin fo ’n casan,
Is mòr an nàire ’s am masladh sud leinn,
An déidh ar dùthaich ’s ar n’àite
An spùilleadh ’s gun bhlaàths againn ann;
Caisteal Dhùinidh an déidh a losgaidh,
’S è ’na làriach lom, thosdach, gun mhiadh;
Gum b’è ’n caochladh goirt è
Gun do chaill sinn gach sochair a b’fhiach...

 

For the full poem please visit  Culloden Day by John Roy Stewart

 

 

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