1745 Association

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Commemoration at St George’s Gardens, Kings Cross, London
Saturday, April 22nd, 2017

Lester Hillman of St Pancras Old ChurchAt 12:30 a brief ceremony was held to commemorate those who died at Culloden as well as those executed on Kennington Common and are interred in these gardens. Nine people attended, (a little disappointing) as well as those from The 1745 Association, there were representatives from The Stewart Society, The Royal Stuart Society, The Friends of St George’s Gardens and Old St Pancras Church.

An introductory few words were made by Mr Steve Lord, who was delighted to announce the attendance of Dr Christopher Duffy this year, also Abbot The Right Reverend Geoffrey Scott, who represented The ’15 Northumbrian Jacobite Society. Both these gentleman gave us Piper Roddy Livingstonea short address, with the Abbot being very erudite in his description of his order and history of Douai Abbey where he is based.

Mr Roddy Livingstone, of the Scottish Piping Society of London, piped for us and played "Lord Lovat's Lament" as an opening piece, after which Dr Duffy spoke of the sacrifice of those on both sides of the conflict of 1745-46 but with special reference to the seventeen men executed on Kennington Common in 1746, sixteen of whom are buried in unmarked graves in the gardens. The seventeenth man was Francis Towneley, the Colonel of The Manchester Regiment, who is buried in the graveyard of St Pancras Old Church, Kings Cross, London. Maureen Lipscomb, Commercial Secretary, laid the 1745 Association's floral tribute at the side of the plaque.St George's Gardens plaque

The ceremony was brought to close by Roddy Livingstone with a rendition of “Lament for the Children" We must give special thanks to Roddy, who has kindly given up his time for the past three years, and always plays so beautifully. Most of us repaired to the Foundling Museum for a welcome and warming lunch. After lunch we persuaded the staff at the museum to allow us into the exhibition area to see William Hogarth's painting "The March of the Guards to Finchley" which depicts a troop of redcoats marching away from London to meet an expected Jacobite army on its way from Derby. In the foreground of the painting are depicted more Hanoverian soldiers who are definitely off duty!

Brian A. Whiting, Editor

Thanks are due to Brian Whiting for the report and Steve Lord for the pictures.