Category Archives: Jacobite Memorabilia

A Jacobite Miscellany (1948) by Tayler, Henrietta, 1869-1951

We have been given permission by The Roxburghe Club to publish A Jacobite Miscellany as a PDF. Edited by Henrietta Taylor (Hetty) in 1948. This book was fully transcribed by me in 2010.

A Jacobite Miscellany download.

This book is, for me, a work of art. It is large and beautifully printed.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A Jacobite Miscellany

A Jacobite miscellany. Eight original papers on the rising of 1745-1746.

  1. Memoria Istorica per l’anno 1744.
  2. Two letters from Magdalen Pringle.
  3. Manuscript account of the expedition to Scotland, by Sir John Macdonald.
  4. Istoria di sua Altezza Reale, il Principe di Galles.
  5. The Prince’s own account of a part of his wanderings.
  6. A portion of the diary of David Lord Elcho, 1721-87.
  7. The loss of the Prince Charles. [By George A. Talbot.]
  8. Letters of Flora Macdonald.

A Jacobite curiosity in Pisa

My dear fellows,

IMG_20150922_162528I’ve just spent a couple of days in Pisa for work and even if sadly I had no time to look around for Jacobite related places (the surroundings of the town should be quite full of them since Pisa was one of the favorite holiday destinations of the Stuart brothers in the Sixties and Seventies) I passed in front of an old building with a slab that caught my attention. I have attached some photos of it since I think it could be considered a sort of Jacobite curiosity. The slab says that Count Vittorio Alfieri, the famous Italian dramatist and infamous lover of Queen Louise, was a guest in the house -which is named Palazzo Venera- from november 1784 to july 1785. The fact has awakened memories of mine since there are many letters written by the Duchess of Albany to her uncle telling that exactly during that period Charles was taking the waters in Bagni di Pisa (“bath of Pisa”, a village now called San Giuliano) and during his daily walks in Pisa he very often met the hated Alfieri and each time Charles was terribly annoyed by these encounters… It’s quite sad that there’s a marble slab to remember the few months of Alfieri in Pisa and nothing to remember the many visits the Stuarts paid to the town.

Just to have an idea of what the Stuart holidays in Bagni di Pisa were like, I suggest to give a look to the website of Villa Corliano, one of the residences used by the Stuarts (now it’s a luxury hotel), of which I also attach some photos retrieved on the net, hoping sooner or later to have the occasion to take some pictures myself.

IMG_20150922_162803

Above “Palazzo Venera” in via Santa Maria n. 36, Pisa

IMG_20150922_163234

Here the slab in memory of Alfieri

Below photos of Villa Corliano, one of the residences of the Stuarts in Pisa

index_02 image 28488_pisa_villa_corliano_pisa

Stuart Papers at Chiddingstone Castle

I received three reels of microfilm containing letters (many signed) and documents pertaining to the Stuart Papers collected by Denys Eyre Bower. In time, I will scan these to PDF and, given permission, publish some of the more interesting ones. Following, is a list of what is on the reels:

Contents – Reel 1

  1. Correspondence signed by members of the House of Stuart – letters Microfilmed in chronological sequence.

(Approximate number of letters)

Mary, Queen of Scots                                 1

James I                                                            8

Charles I                                                        20

Charles II                                                      26

James II                                                         15

William III                                                       8

James III                                                         8

Charles III                                                     11

Victor I          (Including Newspaper cuttings,
twentieth century telegrams, etc.)

  1. Privy Council Documents.

Charles II                                                      18

Anne                                                                2

James II                                                           3

William & Mary                                             2

William III                                                       5

  1. Documents and letters signed by and dealing with the adherents of the Royal House of Stuart.
  2. Papers relating to James III
    Charles II (as Prince of Wales)
    Henry IX (Cardinal York)
    Together with accounts and lists of jewels and banking accounts
  3. Catalogue of Bagot Civil War Documents, items 1 to 89.

Contents – Reel 2

  1. Continuation of the catalogue of Bagot Civil War Documents, items No. 90 to 123.
  2. State Papers:

James I                                                           2

Charles I                                                        6

Charles II                                                     80

James II                                                         7

William III                                                    21

Anne                                                               1

James III                                                      13

Contents – Reel 3

Continuation of State Papers from Reel 2.

Henry, Cardinal of York                        30

Victor                                                            1

(Supplementary to the above

Charles I                                                      3

Charles II                                                     7

4 and 5

Letters of the Sobieski Stuarts, together with bound manuscripts in the sequence in which they appear on the film.

  1. Bound volume containing original autograph letters of the Duke of Monmouth, including drawings and cuttings from the London Gazette.
  2. Bound volume containing copy of the Levant Company Charter confirmed by Charles II.
  3. Bound volume containing the Earl of Halifax’s character of Charles II.
  4. Bound volume containing notes on Clarendon’s History of the Rebellion.
  5. Bound volume containing the account of the Battle of Cape Le Hague by Tobias Smollett.
  6. Bound volume containing autographs connected with the rising in Scotland (1745).
  7. Bound volume containing autographs following the 1745
  8. Bound volume containing the decrees and judgement in favour of Patrick Grant.
  9. Accounts and Reports, etc.
  10. Bound volume containing letters and cuttings relative to Crown Prince Rupert of Bavaria, and the Sobieski Stuarts.
  11. Copies of the Whitehall Review.
  12. General Forster’s farewell.
  13. Various letters, including letters to Edward Walford and letters of Georgina Stuart d’Albany.
  14. Eight letters and documents in the period of Charles II including letters signed by the Earl of Danby.
  15. Various letters, including letters to Sir John Coxe Hippisley. C.1800.

(Hippisley was responsible for initiating the negotiations with the Duchess of Albany’s Executors in Rome for the purchase of the Main Collection of Stuart Papers, on behalf of the Prince of Wales.

These papers are now in the Royal Archives at Windsor Castle, and are available complete on Microfilm, from Micro Methods Ltd.)

These papers have been microfilmed by courtesy of Mr. Denys Eyre Bower, from his private collection at Chiddingstone Castle, Kent, written authority must be obtained from Mr. Bower to quote from, reproduce, or publish any material on the film.

Mr. Denys Eyre Bower started the collection in the 1920’s. It is now the largest collection of its kind in private hands and forms a valuable supplement, though strictly modest compared with that fantastic collection, to the Windsor Stuart Papers. Indeed many documents in Mr. Bower’s collection originally formed part of the Windsor Stuart archives which were separated from the main collection by various circumstances. The letters of the Chevalier Watson in the early 19th century describe in some detail the purchase of the Windsor papers for the de facto occupant of the Crown. The collection consists of many hundreds of documents and letters signed by the Stuart Kings and Queens from Mary Queen of Scots to the later exiled monarchy and their hereditary heirs to modern times, together with their adherents and a few of their opponents where history demands.

An interesting section includes the spurious Sobieski Stuarts of the 19th century whose claims were accepted by many people of note in Scotland and elsewhere.

A. Green

Sheffield University
1969 – 70

Plaque in memory of executed Jacobites, London

 

 

 

In July, August and November 1746 a total of seventeen men were put to death by hanging at the scaffold erected on Kennington Common in London. The men held a variety of ranks and levels of authority and some were Scots and some English. In life they had all been supporters of Prince Charles Edward Stuart during the Rising of 1745/46.

Sixteen of the men are buried in unmarked graves in St George’s Gardens which is just off Gray’s Inn Road and not far from King’s Cross railway station. Unfortunately, the exact location of their remains is not known but as one of the aims of the 1745 Association is to mark the places connected to the rising I am sure members will be pleased to know that this is about to come to fruition. A ground plaque will shortly be unveiled in the gardens to remember the men buried there. The seventeenth was Francis Towneley who was Colonel of the Manchester regiment and his body is buried at St Pancras Old Church not far away.

Nine were members of the Manchester Regiment: Francis Towneley (Col.), Lieutenant John Berwick, Captain Andrew Blood, Captain James Bradshaw, Lieutenant Thomas Deacon, Captain George Fletcher, Lieutenant Thomas Chadwick, Captain James Dawson and Adjutant Thomas Siddall or Syddall. Bradshaw transferred to the Lifeguards –Elcho’s from the Manchester Regt and was captured after Culloden.

Others were John Hamilton of Sandstoun, (Governor of Carlisle), Sir John Wedderburn, 5th Baronet of Blackness (Ogilvy’s Regiment), Captain Andrew Wood, (John Roy Stuart’s Regiment), Captain David Morgan, (Barrister at Law), Captain Donald MacDonald of Kinlochmoidart (Keppoch’s Regiment), Lt Walter Ogilvie, (Lord Lewis Gordon’s Regiment), Captain Alexander Leith, (Glenbuchat’s Regiment) and Lt James Nicholson (Gadd’s Coy -Perth’s Regiment).

The plaque is made of slate with unpainted letters, in keeping with the ambience of the gardens and the text will read:-

In Memory of The Officers and Gentlemen of the Army of Prince Charles Edward Stuart who were executed on Kennington Common in July, August and November 1746.

Nine of the Manchester Regiment and seven Scots are buried here. Francis Towneley, Colonel of the Manchester Regiment lies in the churchyard of Old St Pancras church.

Tandem Triumphans

The 1745 Association

The date of the unveiling of the plaque is not yet known. At the time of writing final permission has been granted and the plaque is ordered. Once the plaque is installed we shall decide upon a date for an unveiling ceremony which I hope will be attended by many people as well as representatives of interested organisations and possibly the press. Further news will be disseminated by email, Jacobite Forum and though the 1745 Association website.

 

DSCN0219

 

Steve Lord

The poems of Alexander Macdonald (Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)

Modern poetry in Scottish Gaelic begins with the brilliant, controversial figure of Alexander MacDonald, better known as Alasdair Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair, who was active during the eighteenth century. His only collection, Aiseirigh na Seann Chànain Albannaich (1751), was the first printed book to be published in any Celtic language. His patriotic poems mocked those who had failed to support the Jacobite cause (such as the Campbells), and in “A Chanibal Dhuidsich” George II is mocked as a German cannibal. Not surprisingly, the book was considered treasonable, and burned by the hangman in Edinburgh.

Here, in Gaelic, French, and English is one of his best known poems:

Oran a rinneadh ‘sa bhliadhna 1746 A Song Composed in the Year 1746

From the same site (with translations from John Lorne Campbell‘s 1932 book) are many others:

Oran Nuadh A New Song
O Thearlaich Mhic Sheumais! O Charles Son of James
Clo Mhic Ille Mhicheil (?) The Cloth of McGhille Micheil
Oran Mhorair Mhic Shiomoin An Elegy on Lord Lovat
Oran nam Fineachan Gaidhealach The Song of the Clans
Oran Do’n Phrionnsa A Song to the Prince
Oran Eile Do’n Phrionnsa Another Song to the Prince
Mile marbhphaisg air ant-saoghal On This Age a Thousand Curses
Mhorag Chiatach Achuil Dualaich Graceful Morag of the Ringlets
A channibal Dhuidsich O German Cannibal
Fuigheall A Fragment
Gairm do Phrionnsa Teàrlach A Call to Prince Charles
O togamaid oirnn thar uisge O Let us Go over the Sea
Fuigheall eile Another Fragment
Brosnachadh eile do na Gàidheil Another incitement for the Gaels

Chiddingstone Castle and the Denys Bower MSS

Has anyone been to see this collection at Chiddingstone Castle near Edenbridge, Kent – in particular the Stuart / Jacobite collection?

“The Curator, together with volunteers, are currently working on a project to catalogue the collection of Royal Stuart documents. These include letters from and to Stuart kings, state papers, and letters and other documents relating to the Jacobites, Bonnie Prince Charlie and the 1745 uprising.”

Chiddingstone Castle
Hill Hoath Road
Chiddingstone, Edenbridge,
Kent TN8 7AD,
United Kingdom
+44 (0)1892 870347

Chiddingstone CastleThis is from The Glasgow Herald – Nov 24, 1951

Jacobites in Mayfair

It has been vastly illuminating to journey Mayfair-wards this afternoon, there to seek out one who has, over the past 20 years or so, assembled such an immense variety of relics of the Royal House of Stuart as must, I imagine, cause him to be the envy of every other antiquarian in the country; in fact the flat which this indefatigable collector, Mr Denys E. Bower, at present occupies is as much a repository of history as a dwelling-place. One spacious room, for instance, is hung from roof to floor with paintings of the Stuarts—outstanding among these being a portrait of Charles II, by Hanneman, which formerly belonged to the Duchess of Kent—and another room is given over to literary and epistolary treasures, while in a third Mr Bower has stored other manuscripts, besides what might be termed the smaller currency of the centuries in the form of miniatures and, nick-nacks. Many of these are extremely rare, and some have been shown at loan exhibitions in Edinburgh during the past three years, perhaps the most notable among them being the last letter which Prince Charles Edward wrote to James III on “ye 2d July, 1745” before leaving France for Scotland.

Historic Links

Though Mr Bower is the managing director of a London firm of antique dealers, his Stuart collection is a separate and private interest in furtherance of which he recently bought, at a public auction, two gold cuff links which were described in a catalogue note as having been given by Prince Charles Edward to Flora Macdonald in 1746. “These gold cuff links,” the note went on, “were previously sold in these rooms on May 15, 1930, as the property of William Smith of Roslin. The links were given to his grandmother as a girl by John Roy Stuart, one of the Prince’s generals, to whom they were given by the Prince.” Mr Bower points out, however, that this last sentence is in error and that the items involved in the 1930 sales were the silver shoe buckles that were worn, by the Prince at Culloden. Subsequently these were given to the Duchess of Hamilton to sell at a bazaar, where they brought £25. Since then Mr Bower has lost all trace of them, and he wonders whether any reader of “The Glasgow Herald “can provide some clues to their whereabouts; likewise he would welcome any information about the newly acquired cuff links. In particular he is anxious to discover why the links should be mounted on a Victorian visiting card which bears on one side the printed name, Miss Robertson, and on the other, the written inscription: “Given by Prince Charles Edward to Flora Macdonald during his flight, a.d. 1746. C. Grainger.”