Tag Archives: Members

A Jacobite curiosity in Pisa

My dear fellows,

IMG_20150922_162528I’ve just spent a couple of days in Pisa for work and even if sadly I had no time to look around for Jacobite related places (the surroundings of the town should be quite full of them since Pisa was one of the favorite holiday destinations of the Stuart brothers in the Sixties and Seventies) I passed in front of an old building with a slab that caught my attention. I have attached some photos of it since I think it could be considered a sort of Jacobite curiosity. The slab says that Count Vittorio Alfieri, the famous Italian dramatist and infamous lover of Queen Louise, was a guest in the house -which is named Palazzo Venera- from november 1784 to july 1785. The fact has awakened memories of mine since there are many letters written by the Duchess of Albany to her uncle telling that exactly during that period Charles was taking the waters in Bagni di Pisa (“bath of Pisa”, a village now called San Giuliano) and during his daily walks in Pisa he very often met the hated Alfieri and each time Charles was terribly annoyed by these encounters… It’s quite sad that there’s a marble slab to remember the few months of Alfieri in Pisa and nothing to remember the many visits the Stuarts paid to the town.

Just to have an idea of what the Stuart holidays in Bagni di Pisa were like, I suggest to give a look to the website of Villa Corliano, one of the residences used by the Stuarts (now it’s a luxury hotel), of which I also attach some photos retrieved on the net, hoping sooner or later to have the occasion to take some pictures myself.

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Above “Palazzo Venera” in via Santa Maria n. 36, Pisa

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Here the slab in memory of Alfieri

Below photos of Villa Corliano, one of the residences of the Stuarts in Pisa

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Thesis from Stefano Baccolo and thanks to the 1745 Association

Stefano Baccolo, in his university thesis “Carlo Stuart in Italia 1766-1788—La Corte di un principe in esilio”, thanks the members of the 1745 Association.

RINGRAZIAMENTI

Al di fuori dell’ambiente universitario desidero ringraziare l’amico Dave
Waddell per il supporto che diede alla mia ricerca del testamento di Carlo
Stuart, che fu poi lo spunto per questo lavoro. Con lui ringrazio per
l’interesse e la simpateticità con cui seguirono la stessa ricerca anche Mag-
gie Craig, Stephen Lord c tutto il resto della 1745 Association, di cui sono
fiero d’essere membro.

In English:

THANKS

Outside of the university, I would like to thank my friend Dave Waddell for the support he gave to my research of the Will of Charles Stuart, which later became the inspiration for this work. I thank him for the interest and understanding which followed the same research also Maggie Craig, Stephen Lord and the rest of the 1745 Association, of which I am proud to be a member.

The poems of Alexander Macdonald (Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair)

Modern poetry in Scottish Gaelic begins with the brilliant, controversial figure of Alexander MacDonald, better known as Alasdair Mac Mhaighstir Alasdair, who was active during the eighteenth century. His only collection, Aiseirigh na Seann Chànain Albannaich (1751), was the first printed book to be published in any Celtic language. His patriotic poems mocked those who had failed to support the Jacobite cause (such as the Campbells), and in “A Chanibal Dhuidsich” George II is mocked as a German cannibal. Not surprisingly, the book was considered treasonable, and burned by the hangman in Edinburgh.

Here, in Gaelic, French, and English is one of his best known poems:

Oran a rinneadh ‘sa bhliadhna 1746 A Song Composed in the Year 1746

From the same site (with translations from John Lorne Campbell‘s 1932 book) are many others:

Oran Nuadh A New Song
O Thearlaich Mhic Sheumais! O Charles Son of James
Clo Mhic Ille Mhicheil (?) The Cloth of McGhille Micheil
Oran Mhorair Mhic Shiomoin An Elegy on Lord Lovat
Oran nam Fineachan Gaidhealach The Song of the Clans
Oran Do’n Phrionnsa A Song to the Prince
Oran Eile Do’n Phrionnsa Another Song to the Prince
Mile marbhphaisg air ant-saoghal On This Age a Thousand Curses
Mhorag Chiatach Achuil Dualaich Graceful Morag of the Ringlets
A channibal Dhuidsich O German Cannibal
Fuigheall A Fragment
Gairm do Phrionnsa Teàrlach A Call to Prince Charles
O togamaid oirnn thar uisge O Let us Go over the Sea
Fuigheall eile Another Fragment
Brosnachadh eile do na Gàidheil Another incitement for the Gaels

THE BEST OF ENEMIES by Christopher Duffy

 

THE BEST OF ENEMIES

Germans against Jacobites, 1746

 

One of the best stories of the Forty Five yet to be told, that of the Hessian soldiers who marched into the Pass of Killiecrankie.The Hessians have been portrayed as the villains of the Forty Five, brutal mercenaries. Yet they were very different from the legend. Their leader, Prince Frederick sympathised more with his foes than with his allies. In later years his crisis of conscience would perplex Germany.

TheBestOfEnemies

 The Jacobite clans were on the Great Atholl Raid. Their leader, Lord George Murray, hoped to outflank the army of the Duke of Cumberland. This may have been a fine chance for Jacobite victory. The result was the siege of Blair Castle. The Hessians defended their base at Dunkeld from Jacobite probes. Then they were ordered to relieve the Castle by marching through the feared Pass of Killiecrankie. 

The cast of characters includes many who behaved unexpectedly: the irresponsible defenders of the Castle; the rival Dukes of Atholl; the Campbell whose assassination featured in Stevenson’s novel Kidnapped; the inn-servant Molly; the European hussars seeking information by talking in Latin, the irascible Duke of Cumberland; the lovelorn Earl of Craufurd, attached to the Hessian force; and many more.

Visit site.

MacGillvary connections

I had a question come to me perhaps someone can help?

Hello,

I came across your page, based on the page for the Bonnie Prince Charlie long march. My mother is a MacGillvary, and her ancestors came from the Arisaig / Glen Mama area. There might be a connection to John Mor McGilvray who fell at Culloden, based on an obituary in 1860 from Prince Edward Island. I was wondering if there is much historical research done by the Association, as records are quite sparse and I am interested in finding out more. In addition to MacGillvray ancestry, I have McEachern, McRae and McKinnon ancestry, most likely from Moidart – all staunch Jacobites and all forced out during the Clearances, and settled in Prince Edward Island.

Thanks,

John john.loughney@nokia.com

My reply

As you probably know John Mor McGilivray was a major in Lady Anne MacIntosh’s regiment. He was killed at Culloden.

There is a ref to him In “Lyon in Mourning” vol ii p 280
“The late Glenaladale told the Revd. D.Macintosh, that he saw the Major of the Mackintoshes a gun-shot past the enemy’s cannon at Culloden Muir. The Major’s name was John MacGilvrae”
That is the only ref. I know for him I am sorry to say. I will post your letter and my reply on our website and maybe someone with clan connections can help
Steve

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Wordpress posts

4. The quality of a post is determined by its content so feel free to add pictures, links to relevant information, and Categorize and Tag the post appropriately so that it can be easily found. As an example of a good post with lots of content, see the Chiddingstone Castle post.
http://1745association.org.uk/wp1745/?p=614

I will add more help as you get more familiar with using the members-only section. For now, I encourage everyone to login and post. Remember, only Comment if it is relevant to the Original Post — avoid commenting on the comments.

“Tell me and I’ll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I’ll understand.” Chinese Proverb